Upcoming event – An afternoon of global health with ResIn and RSTMH
Monday 18 September, 3:15pm – 4:45pm
University of Southampton, Highfield Campus
Free to attend, all welcome!

Click here to register, or click here to download a flyer, or instead see our latest post for more information about the event.

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The Research Investments in Global Health (ResIn) study is an analysis of global investments in health research, and is based at the University of Southampton.

wordcloud diseasesOur work so far has previously focused on describing the UK portfolio of infectious disease research over the time period of 1997 to 2013.

In 2015, we were awarded funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to cover infectious disease research investment analyses across the G20 countries, with a particular focus on the investment portfolios relate to pneumonia, neonatal infectious disease and maternal immunisation. Findings from this study will be published in autumn/winter 2017. We have also been successful in securing further small grants from the University of Southampton and the Royal Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene to widen the scope of our research.

See the publications page for our numerous published outputs, and also the ‘about us’ page for our activity when informing government, funding agencies, policymakers, research institutions and individual researchers.

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Recent updates

  • An afternoon of global health with ResIn and RSTMH

  • Free event – An afternoon of global health with ResIn and RSTMH
    Monday 18 September, 3:15pm – 4:45pm
    University of Southampton, Highfield Campus
    All welcome!

    Click here to register

    Preceded by a brief introduction from Professor David Wilson, Associate Dean for Internationalisation, this event will include two talks –

    a) Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Strategy Launch – RSTMH Chief Executive, Tamar Ghosh, will present the Society’s new strategy, including information about several new activities including mentoring, education and training. There will also be time to discuss the benefits of RSTMH membership which include journal access, a calendar of scientific and social events, plus a well-established grants round.

    b) Presentation of the results of the Southampton-led Research Investments in Global Health Study (ResIn).
    Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and enthusiastically received by (among others) the World Health Organisation, Dr’s Michael Head and Rebecca Brown have analysed 16 years of data on global infectious disease funding. How much funding goes to HIV research compared to tuberculosis? Is pneumonia an under-funded and neglected area? What does the research landscape look like for malaria investments in sub-Saharan Africa? What can we learn from the historical financing of research for Ebola? What should the research landscape look like going forward, and how should we in the global health community be setting future priorities?

    This event is open to colleagues both within the University of Southampton and externally. Everybody is welcome!

    Location – Senate Room, 4th floor, building 37, Highfield campus of the University of Southampton.

    Webpage to register – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/an-afternoon-of-global-health-with-resin-and-rstmh-tickets-36099988036

    Click here for a pdf flyer of the event. 

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  • ResIn original research in Lancet Global Health – malaria investments in Africa

  • The latest analysis from the Research Investments in Global Health study has been published in The Lancet Global Health. This work covered malaria investments for R&D and funding for malaria control, and focused on their geographical distribution around sub-Saharan Africa.

    Our research showed that countries that receive higher levels of funding for malaria-related research also typically receive higher levels of funding for malaria control (non-research investments). Thus, nations such as Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda are relatively well-funded compared to nations such as Chad, Central African Republic and Sierra Leone. We discuss some of the likely reasons for this and consider further analyses that underpin these findings, and add pragmatic commentary on potential ways forward.

    The paper is open-access and available here. Suggested citation –

    Head MG, Goss S, Gelister Y et al. Inequalities in investments: a systematic analysis of global funding trends for malaria research in sub-Saharan AfricaThe Lancet Global Health. 2017. doi: 10.1016/S2214-109X(17)30245-0

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  • First full ResIn article on cancer research investments

  • We are pleased to announce the first ResIn publication covering UK cancer research investments. It is published in BMJ Open, and the full open-access publication can be found by clicking here.

    We assessed thousands of research projects covering all types of cancer, and identify areas of research strength in the UK and areas where the portfolio is relatively weak. Breast and prostate cancers, for example, received relatively high investment compared to burden of disease whilst there was little funding for cancer of the liver, thyroid, lung, upper GI tract and bladder, despite high burdens of disease. Around two-thirds of the investment is for pre-clinical science.

     

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